Anu Põder

Anu Põder, Tongues, 1998. Courtesy of Art Museum of Estonia, Tallinn. Photo: Hedi Jaansoo

Anu Põder, Tongues, 1998. Courtesy of Art Museum of Estonia, Tallinn. Photo: Hedi Jaansoo

Anu Põder, Tongues, 1998. Courtesy of Art Museum of Estonia, Tallinn. Photo: Hedi Jaansoo

Anu Põder, Tongues, 1998. Courtesy of Art Museum of Estonia, Tallinn. Photo: Hedi Jaansoo

Anu Põder, Tongues, 1998. Courtesy of Art Museum of Estonia, Tallinn. Photo: Hedi Jaansoo

Anu Põder, Tongues, 1998. Courtesy of Art Museum of Estonia, Tallinn. Photo: Hedi Jaansoo

Anu Põder (19472013, Estonia) was a sculptor whose practice remained relatively unknown to an international audience until recently. Interested in the fragility and impermanence or human-like ‘lifespan’ of materials, Põder favoured the use of textile, wax, plaster, soap, glue, plastic and wood throughout her artistic career. She began working in the 1970s within the context of a so-called ‘bronze age’ within Estonian art, when the visual language of heavy and solid materials such as bronze and granite was dominant. Conversely, Põder explored the capacity of materials to deteriorate, corrode and change appearance. Recent exhibitions include Baltic Triennial, Lithuania (2018) and the major retrospective Anu Põder: Be Fragile! Be Brave! at Kumu Art Museum, Tallinn (2017).