Haroon Mirza

Haroon Mirza, /\/\/\/\/\/\, 2017. Installation view at Farol Santander, o Paulo. Originally produced for LiFE-Ville de Saint-Nazaire, 2017. Photo: Carol Quintanilha

Haroon Mirza, Digital Switchover, 2012. Installation view at Kunst Halle Sankt Gallen. PhotoGunnar Meier

Haroon Mirza, /\/\/\/\/\/\, 2017. Installation view at Nikolaj Kunsthal, 2018. Originally produced for LiFE-Ville de Saint-Nazaire, 2017. Courtesy of hrm199 and Nikolaj Kunsthal. Photo: Per Wessel

Haroon Mirza, ããã, 2016. Installation view at Pivô, São Paulo. Courtesy Pivô and hrm199. Photo: Everton Ballardin

Haroon Mirza, /\/\/\/\/\/\, 2017. Installation view at Farol Santander, o Paulo. Originally produced for LiFE-Ville de Saint-Nazaire, 2017. Photo: Carol Quintanilha

Haroon Mirza (b. 1977, London, UK) lives and works in London, UK. Mirza’s work tests the interplay and friction between sound and light waves and electric current. He devises sculptures, performances and immersive installations that pry on one’s awareness of their own experience. An advocate of interference, he creates situations that purposefully cross wires. He describes his role as a composer, manipulating his primary medium, electricity, a live, invisible and volatile natural phenomenon. Mirza asks us to reconsider the perceptual distinctions between noise, sound and music, and draws into question the categorisation of cultural forms. Recent exhibitions include Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Australia (2019); John Hansard Gallery, UK (2019); Sifang Art Museum, China (2019); and Ikon, UK (2018).

Project Description

Haroon Mirza’s new performance, The Three /\/\/\/’s 2021, explores social gatherings and ritual and is informed by the Fibonacci sequence and golden ratio – a mathematical phenomenon visible throughout nature and often applied in classical art. The performance asks us to consider the sociological and physiological properties of the human voice, and explores Mirza's interest in sound waves and patterns of movement. The Three /\/\/\/’s begins with performers humming octaves of the frequency 111Hz, associated to physiological responses and ancient architecture, while the combination of collective sound and synchronised movement fosters a sense of ritual, gathering and ceremony. The performance will not invite an audience while restrictions apply, and will instead be documented, with the resulting video available to view online. 

Commissioned by Liverpool Biennial. Supported by Open Culture.