Public Programme of Talks


The public programme of talks for Liverpool Biennial 2018 is curated by The Serving Library in partnership with LJMU’s Exhibition Research Lab. A wide-ranging list of participants including economists, sociologists, media theorists, architects and painters are invited to variously address or refract the question borrowed from Friedrich Schiller to title the Biennial: Beautiful world, where are you?.

26 October 2018Aliens, Fieldwork, and Universal Grammar – Jessica Coon and a Conversation with Vincenzo Latronico
A talk by Jessica Coon and a conversation with Vincenzo Latronico
18 October 2018Reclaiming Beauty as a Public Good – Angela Nagle
A talk by Angela Nagle (Writer, author of Kill All Normies, Dublin and New York)
11 October 2018A Great Enchanted Garden: Can AI Give Us Back Our Sense of Wonder? – Ryan Avent
A talk by Ryan Avent (Senior Editor and Free Exchange Columnist, The Economist, Arlington, USA)
27 September 2018The Fabric of the Planetary Surface – Jussi Parikka
A talk by Jussi Parikka (Professor of Technological Culture and Aesthetics, University of Southampton, UK, and Docent of Digital Culture Theory, University of Turku, Finland)
13 September 2018Self-Repairing Cities – Mark Miodownik
A talk by Mark Miodownik (Professor of Materials and Society, University College London)
26 July 2018Climate Grief and the Visible Horizon – Meehan Crist
A talk by Meehan Crist (Writer-in-residence in Biological Sciences, Columbia University, New York)
05 July 2018Moonlight and LED – Ei Arakawa and Silke Otto-Knapp
An exchange between Ei Arakawa (Artist, New York) and Silke Otto-Knapp (Artist, Los Angeles)
28 June 2018Outside the Hit Factory – Alexander Provan
A performative talk by Alexander Provan (Editor and Co-founder of Triple Canopy, New York)
07 June 2018Forensic Aesthetics – Eyal Weizman
A talk by Forensic Architecture founder Eyal Weizman (Forensic Architecture, Goldsmiths College, London)
24 May 2018Native Economies: From the Potlatch Ban to the Masks of Beau Dick – Candice Hopkins
A performative talk by Candice Hopkins (Art Historian and Curator, Toronto)